Transformations 0.0.145

Transformations Type Converter

Conversion between data types. Envisaged as a possible alternative to the Universal Type Converter http://www.codeproject.com/Articles/248440/Universal-Type-Converter, with the provision for default values, and some extra features.

Install-Package Transformations -Version 0.0.145
dotnet add package Transformations --version 0.0.145
<PackageReference Include="Transformations" Version="0.0.145" />
For projects that support PackageReference, copy this XML node into the project file to reference the package.
paket add Transformations --version 0.0.145
The NuGet Team does not provide support for this client. Please contact its maintainers for support.

Release Notes

* You don't need to reference the transformations namespace with Using statement (type conversions are meant to be universal if you choose to use this).

Generally you would just do:

 var newValue = oldValue.ConvertTo<newType>(optionalDefaultValue);

* You can use TryConvertTo if you need to get the result of the conversion process.

* You can do some conversions on DataTables and Lists , for example convert a data table to an object list, if the names of the columns match the object properties.

* The date conversion is set to British date format by default, not the project's current format. This may have to change to make the library more "universal".

* From some basic tests I have performed on universal type converter and this library, I found it to be a bit faster than the universal type converter...

********************************************
Some examples of use:
********************************************
string valueInput = "7F8C14B6-B3A8-4F71-8EFC-E5A7B35923B6";
Guid actual = valueInput.ConvertTo<Guid>(Guid.Empty);
// where Guid.Empty is the default value if the conversion fails.
// -----------------------------------------------
string valueInput = "0.1";
float actual = valueInput.ConvertTo<float>(0.0f);
// where 0.0f is the default value if the conversion fails.
// result = 0.1f;
// -----------------------------------------------
string valueInput = "15/02/2014";
DateTime actual = valueInput.ConvertTo<DateTime>(new DateTime(2000, 01, 01));
// where 2000-01-01 is the default value if the conversion fails.
// result = new DateTime(2014, 02, 15);
// -----------------------------------------------
float? f = 123.524f;
int? i = f.ConvertTo<int>();
// result = 124;
// -----------------------------------------------

* You can convert date to 'excel'-type value:
DateTime d = new DateTime(2005, 5, 5);
d.ToDouble();
// or d.ToInt();

List conversions examples:
// -----------------------------------------------
List<int> l1 = new List<int>(new int[] { 2, 3, 4 });
List<float> l2 = l1.ConvertToList<int, float>();
// -----------------------------------------------



**************************************************

Some additional helper methods are added as extensions as well:

// -----------------------------------------------

*Proper Case*

string name = "mr john smith";
name.ProperCase();
// result = "Mr John Smith";

// -----------------------------------------------

*Insert Spaces*

string name = "MrJohnSmith";
name.InsertSpaces();
// result = "Mr John Smith";

// -----------------------------------------------

*Remove Chars* - removes multiple instances of the same string pattern from the string.

string name = "Mr John John Smith";
name.RemoveChars("John ");
// result = "Mr Smith";

// -----------------------------------------------

*Replace Ex* - replace multiple instances of the same string pattern in the string.
string s = "12345678901234567890";
s.ReplaceEx("2", "X");
// result = "1X345678901X34567890";

// -----------------------------------------------

*Is Date* - check if string is a date! assumes en-Gb as default culture at present..

string s = "14/02/2014";
if (IsDate(s))
{ ... }
if (IsDate(s, "en-GB"))
{ ... }

// -----------------------------------------------

.ToSqlParameter() extension methods make it easier to effectively make the swift conversion to SqlParameters from most types, but please always check that the correct SqlDbType is supplied...

For example, if you wanted to supply myChar parameter to a stored procedure - a char conversion could be:

char c = 'a';
c.ToSqlParameter('myChar');
- and you would probably want to add SqlParameter to the list of parameters.

When converting a string to a varchar / nvarchar, a size of the string is required. It's usually the best practice to supply the string size to avoid runtime errors.

I'm thinking of adding a completely separate validation method to SqlParameter list, which will test that each conversion can be performed correctly.

// -----------------------------------------------


Added DataTable.HasRows()
// ie: dataTable != null && dataTable.Rows.Count > 0

Added DataRow.GetValue<T>()
- Gets the value as required type.

// -----------------------------------------------

New:

Added Some Enum extensions, eg:

YourEnum.EnumElement.ToByte()
// gives an int enum for this enum

Same applies to
[...].ToDecimal()
[...].ToDouble()
[...].ToInt()
[...].ToLong()
etc.

Dependencies

This package has no dependencies.

Version History

Version Downloads Last updated
0.0.145 329 7/4/2017
0.0.144 228 5/19/2017
0.0.143 209 5/18/2017
0.0.142 224 5/16/2017
0.0.140 349 11/4/2016
0.0.139 226 11/4/2016
0.0.138 229 11/3/2016
0.0.137 222 11/3/2016
0.0.136 226 11/3/2016
0.0.135 245 11/2/2016
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0.0.129 383 12/14/2015
0.0.128 296 12/11/2015
0.0.127 265 12/10/2015
0.0.126 299 12/9/2015
0.0.125 287 11/20/2015
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